S3 EPISODE 21 - Effects of Protein Supplementation on Strength and Fat-Free Mass w/ Rob Morton PhD(c)

In Season 3, Episode 21 Dr. Bubbs interviews Rob Morton, PhD Candidate in the Protein Metabolism Research Laboratory under the mentorship of Dr. Stuart Phillips at McMaster University. In this episode, Rob talks about his research into the effects of protein supplementation on strength and fat-free mass. He’ll highlight just how much of a benefit (or not) protein supplementation has when combined with strength training, if athletes need more protein than recreational trainees, and how much protein type really matters. Rob also discusses the impact of protein supplementation on fat-free mass, if there is an upper threshold for muscle protein synthesis, and what happens to protein excess in the body. Finally, Rob shares key insights on how protein requirements change as you age, effects on kidney health, and the evolution of research in this area.

Summary of This Episode

5:00 – Rob’s background

10:30 – Benefits of added protein supplementation for athletes

12:00 – How much does training impact your gains vs. protein supplementation?

13:00 – Protein types – Does it even matter?

14:30 – What is the proposed upper threshold for muscle protein synthesis?

17:00 – How is excessive protein intake utilized in the body?

19:00 - Is 1g per pound bodyweight still a good heuristic?

22:30 -  How to achieve higher doses of protein as we age?

30:30 -  Protein intake and kidney health

36:00 – General heuristics on protein and health

40:00 – The evolution of research on protein and health

About Rob Morton PhD(c)

Robert Morton is a PhD Candidate in the Protein Metabolism Research Laboratory under the mentorship of Dr. Stuart Phillips at McMaster University. Rob’s passion is understanding how exercise and nutrition mediate skeletal muscle size, and why there is individual variability. Rob combines his background in Strength and Conditioning with his academic training to provide a practical and evidence-based appraisal of current dogma in sport science. Indeed, Rob’s research has been published in leading sport science journals and has been featured in a number of media outlets including The New York Times, The Globe and Mail, Global News, Men’s Health and Sports Illustrated.